The History of Botox® Cosmetic

, , , , , , ,

No one can argue that the use of Botox® cosmetic to help alleviate the signs of facial aging has become incredibly popular.  In 2013 alone, over 6.3 million treatments were preformed in the United States with Botulinum Toxin Type A, the active ingredient in cosmetic injectables like Botox® and Dysport®, and that number continues to rise every year.  However, despite its incredible popularity, many don’t know the fascinating history behind the development of this extremely versatile facial rejuvenation procedure.

1820’s – Dr. Justinus Kerner studies a batch of improperly prepared blood sausages responsible for the death of several dozen Germans.  His experiments lead to a better understanding of the neurological symptoms of food-borne botulism (drooping eyelids, difficulty swallowing, muscle weakness, and if left untreated, paralysis and respiratory failure).

1890’s – While investigating an outbreak of botulism, Dr. Emile Pierre van Ermengem of Belgium is able to make a connection between botulism and a spore-forming bacterium he named Bacillus botulinus (later renamed Clostridium botulinum).

1953 – Physiologist Dr. Vernon Brooks discovers that injecting small amounts of botulinum toxin into a hyperactive muscle blocks the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve endings, causing temporary “relaxation” and reducing involuntary muscle spasms.

1978 – After several years of injecting botulinum toxin type A into monkeys in an attempt to discover if its muscle relaxing effects might help in the treatment of strabismus, or crossed eyes, Dr. Alan B. Scott receives FDA approval to inject tiny amounts of botulinum toxin into human volunteers.

1988 – The pharmaceutical company Allergan Inc. acquires the rights to distribute Scott’s batch of botulinum toxin type A, and begins conducting additional research.  Eventually, it is discovered that the drug can also provide patients with temporary relief from facial spasms, neck and shoulder spasms, and even vocal cord spasms.

1989 – The FDA approves botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of both strabismus (crossed eyes) and blepharospasm (spasms of the eyelid muscle).  Allergan introduces it to the market under the brand name Botox® Cosmetic.

1992 – After noticing that her blepharospasm patients were starting to lose their frown lines, Canadian ophthalmologist Dr. Jean Carruthers, and her dermatologist husband, publishes a study in the Journal of Dermatologic Surgery and Oncology stating that though temporary, “treatment with C. botulinum-A exotoxin is a simple, safe procedure” for the treatment of brow wrinkles.

1997 – Botox® use increases so rapidly that the country’s supply is temporary exhausted until a new batch receives FDA approval.

2002 – FDA approves Botox® Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA), the same formulation as Botox®, for use in alleviating moderate to severe frown lines between the eye brows.

2004 – FDA approves Botox® for the treatment of severe underarm sweating that does not respond well to topical medicines.

2006 – Botox® sales soar past the $1 billion mark, with cosmetic uses accounting for about half of sales.

2010 – FDA approves Botox® therapy for increased muscle stiffness in elbow, wrist, and finger muscles with upper limb spasticity.   Later that year, Botox® becomes the first medicine to be approved by the FDA specifically for the prevention of headaches in adults who suffer from chronic migraines.

2014 – Botox® Cosmetic receives FDA approval for the temporary treatment of moderate to severe crow’s feet, also known as lateral canthal lines.

If you have any questions about Botox® cosmetic or are interested in any of the treatments that I offer, please contact us today to schedule a consultation.  Additionally, Atlanta Plastic Surgery, P.C. provides a variety of options for financing, including Care Credit®, to assist you.  Don’t forget to connect with me, Dr. Hunter Moyer, on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ for the latest plastic surgery news.

Facelift Remains the Gold Standard in Facial Rejuvenation

, , , , , ,

There are many options available today for facial rejuvenation, ranging from minimally-invasive skin resurfacing techniques and injectable cosmetics to surgical procedures like blepharoplasty and facial liposuction.  The most dramatic and long lasting results can still be achieved by a traditional facelift procedure, or rhytidectomy.  Statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons list facelifts as one of the five most commonly performed procedures in 2013, and their popularity continues to increase each year.  While many procedures may help delay the time at which a facelift becomes appropriate and complement the results of surgery, a traditional facelift can only be performed surgically; non-surgical rejuvenation treatments cannot achieve the same results.

A facelift procedure cannot radically change a person’s appearance or stop the aging process, but it can dramatically improve visible signs of aging in the face and neck.  Facelifts are designed to alleviate sagging in the mid-face and the deep creases below the lower eyelids or along the nose extending to the corner of the mouth.  They also can correct the loss of skin tone in the lower face that creates jowls and remove the excess fatty deposits under the chin and jaw that can give even a person of normal weight the appearance of a double chin.  Many also choose to complement a facelift procedure with a neck lift or eyelid surgery in order to maximize their final results.

A full facelift procedure involves the removal of excess fat and skin, the tightening of underlying muscles, and the repositioning of the skin around the face and neck.  Traditionally, facelift incisions began in the hairline at the temples, continued around the ear, and ended in the lower scalp.  However, modern techniques allow for shorter incisions hidden in the natural creases of the face.  I also perform a special facelift technique, originally developed at Emory, which tightens and supports the strong suspensory ligaments deeper in the face, effectively prolonging the plastic surgery results.

If you’re interested in cosmetic or reconstructive procedures that I perform, please contact us today to schedule a consultation.  Don’t forget to connect with me, Dr. Hunter Moyer, on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ for the latest plastic surgery news.

Facial Rejuvenation on Your Schedule

, , , , , ,

Many people would like to look younger but few people can find the time, given our busy, fast-paced, and highly active lifestyles, to take days off to recover from an extensive surgical procedure.  Fortunately, I offer a wide array of non-surgical facial rejuvenation options that require minimal downtime and can provide subtle and elegant changes perfect for those not quite ready for the more comprehensive changes that full surgery may entail.  In fact, given so many different options, it may be difficult to determine which is best suited to your needs.  So here is a comparison of the most popular facial rejuvenation treatments to help you determine exactly which one is right for you.

Cosmetic Injectables 
Brand Name: Botox® Cosmetic
What does it do? Relaxes the wrinkle causing facial muscles between and around the eyes and along the forehead, reducing the appearance of crow’s feet and the fine lines and wrinkles in the forehead created by expression.
How long does it take? The actual time of the procedure can vary depending on the amount of area being treated, but is generally an average of 15 minutes.  You can usually begin to see results a couple days after treatment.
What’s the downtime? You can expect to resume your normal activities immediately after the procedure; however, avoid rubbing or massaging the treated area or lying down for several hours, as this can cause the medication to migrate.
How long do the effects last? Depending on the area being treated, effects can last an average of four to six months.
Facial Fillers
Brand Names: Juvéderm®, Restylane®, and Voluma™
What do they do? Restore lost volume and plumpness to areas of the face such as the cheeks, around the mouth, and the lips with hyaluronic acid and stimulating collagen production.
How long does it take? Effects are apparent in 15 to 30 minutes depending upon the area treated.
What’s the downtime? You can expect to resume your normal activities immediately after the procedure.
How long do the effects last? Six to 24 months, depending on the specific brand used and areas treated.
Laser Skin Resurfacing
Brand Name: Sciton®
What does it do? Removes the old and damaged upper layers of skin to reveal newer, younger looking skin beneath – in the process, this removes unwanted wrinkles, sunspots, hair, and moles while improving the appearance of scars and stimulating collagen production.  The procedure is safe and effective on patients of all ages and skin types.
How long does it take? A typical session is 15 to 45 minutes, depending on the areas being treated.  However, full results may require multiple sessions for some conditions.
What’s the downtime? Minor swelling can be expected as well as a mild itching or burning sensation over the next few days.  Skin may become dry and begin to peel during the healing process which can last for several days.
How long do the effects last? After the procedure, the amount of time it takes for the new skin to show signs of damage or age depends on the patient’s long term care and maintenance.

 

There are a number of effective treatments that can be incorporated into your daily routine to additionally help take care of your skin.  In my recent two-part skin care series, I detail “the good, the not so good and the bad” side of skin care products that I recommend to my patients who wish to further maintain their facial rejuvenation results.

If you are interested in the facial rejuvenation procedures I perform, contact us today.  Also, connect with me, Dr. Hunter Moyer on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for more plastic surgery updates and latest news.

What is Laser Skin Resurfacing?

, , , , ,

When your conversations are Skype video conferences and your pictures are all in ultra-high definition even minor facial imperfections can seem obvious to the entire world.  Damage from wind and sun and the relentless effects of time and gravity can leave skin looking marred and blemished far beyond its years.  Board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Hunter Moyer keeps abreast of the most advanced technology to help minimize facial imperfections and leave skin looking fresh and revitalized with laser skin resurfacing.

Laser skin resurfacing uses high intensity light to vaporize the damaged skin in the outer layers of skin.  This creates a uniform “injury” to your skin, similar to deeper chemical peel or dermabrasion but with extremely precise control of the depth and location of the damage.  The removal of the damaged skin effectively reduces the appearance of acne, scars, and sun or liver spots, while stimulating the production of collagen.  As the skin heals, the newer skin that forms is younger-looking and more elastic, alleviating the appearance of wrinkles and the fine “smile lines” while giving the skin a fresh, healthy glow.

Sciton® laser skin resurfacing is the most advanced FDA-approved system that Dr. Moyer uses to remove damaged skin.  As Sciton® laser strength is fully customizable, it can be safely used on patients of all ages with a variety of skin tones and pigments.  An added benefit of Sciton® technology is that its intense beam of focused energy treats the most minute imperfections without damaging the surrounding tissue.

Laser resurfacing is generally performed as an outpatient procedure, with varied treatment times that depend on the specific area/s being treated.  Minor swelling can be expected as well as a mild itching or burning sensation over the next few days.  Additionally, skin may become dry and begin to peel during the healing process which (depending on the skin condition that was treated) can last for several days.  After treatment, it is particularly important that you use a “broad-spectrum” sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 45 or higher that screens ultraviolet B and ultraviolet A rays like those recommended in Dr. Moyer’s previous blogs on skin care.  By limiting your time outside you’ll not only protect your skin from harmful rays that can lead to skin cancer, but decrease the risk of adverse effects caused by light sensitivity.

If you are interested in skin care technology or the facial rejuvenation procedures Dr. Moyer performs, contact us today.  Also, connect with Dr. Moyer on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for more plastic surgery updates and the latest news articles.